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Showing posts with the label My Quilting Studio

TOP 10 favourite things in my studio . . .

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Like most of you, my studio had humble beginnings but over time evolved into a creative sanctuary. As in any good studio, there are special items that keep me inspired, grounded, and working efficiently. In no special order, these are the Top 10 things in my studio I would never part with. 1.  MY ART QUILT ON THE QUILTING ARTS MAGAZINE COVER This framed Quilting Arts magazine cover featuring one of my art quilts helps to remind me that hard work and perseverance can pay off and that even though I've created some epic fails, I've also created some beautiful work that others can appreciate. In 2012 my art quilt Mother Ship was selected to be published for the Quilting Arts magazine Readers Challenge. I was even more excited when I was told my art was going to be on the front cover of the magazine. The Readers Challenge was to create an art quilt interpreting the phrase "What If." Being a UFO/alien buff, I wondered "What if I saw a UFO over my house?" an

Quilting room storage: Revamped vintage dresser

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This is a great storage idea that I wanted to share. I can't afford much for storage furniture so I normally have to think outside the box to furnish my sewing room. I picked this little mid-century modern dresser at a thrift store. I desperately needed more storage for my batting, backing and those miscellaneous things that needed a home. I forgot to take the before picture but, basically, the original was sprayed in a dark stain and had super ugly drawer handles. After combing over ideas on Pinterest, I came up with this. I really love how it turned out. And I can keep an awful lot of stuff in these drawers. UPDATE: June 2021 Dresser was sold for $150. I paid $40 for the original so I made a $110 profit.😀 I used that $$ to buy IKEA shelving for my studio.

Sewing Machine Bookends: Cool quilting room décor

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Last weekend hubby and I took a nice drive in the country to pick up these incredible vintage sewing machine bookends for my sewing room. Aren't these the coolest things you've ever seen? I first saw similar bookends on Pinterest, so I had my eye on these for a while after seeing them on a Facebook group. I was happy the artist, Greg at Prairiepickers.com , still had the bookends when I finally texted him last week to buy them. They cost $100. I thought that was a very good deal considering all the work that went into them. The sewing machine is circa 1920s. Even the wooden bases are from an old sewing machine table. Greg told me he normally upcycles the bases of vintage sewing machines into tables. He said he's usually left with the machine when the table is finished. So, he decided to make something out of a machine because he didn't want to throw it out. The set even came with some vintage wooden spools of thread. I would love to find more of these spools

DIY Quilter's Ironing Board

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HOW TO MAKE A QUILTERS IRONING BOARD I've used a regular ironing board for quilting my whole life. So, when I started seeing these wide ironing boards for quilting, I knew I had to have one. I wish I'd made one of these years ago because it truly makes a difference when ironing quilt tops. If you have an ironing board, you can make one of these quilting boards yourself in a day. SUPPLIES Standard metal ironing board 20" x 55" - 3/8" or 1/2" plywood (No saw? Most hardware stores will cut this for you.) [8] screws [8] washers [1] 26" x 60" cotton duck fabric . [1] 24" x 60" insulated batting. (I used Insul-Brite® by Warm Company ) [2] 24" x 60" 100% cotton quilt batting TOOLS TOOLS Measuring Tape Pencil Screwdriver Handsaw Sandpaper Staple gun and staples shorter than the thickness of your board INSTRUCTIONS 1.  Measure and mark 1½ inches from the corners of the board. (Fig.1). Figure 1 2.  Cut this amount off the corner a h

FREE Fat Quarter Storage Box

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Like most quilters, my fabric stash often fills up faster than I can store it, ending up with me not knowing what I have or what I don't have. Thankfully, I love organizing and having a place for everything and everything in its place. I normally buy fat quarters and charm packs for my projects, so I needed a storage solution that would keep them nicely organized and in plain sight. After much experimenting, I came up with a box that's perfect for storing fat quarters and charm packs. HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN FAT QUARTER STORAGE BOX               YOU WILL NEED Download the Fat Quarter Storage Box template   HERE Printer [1] 24"x 36" cardboard sheet, cut into two 24" x 18" sheets. (Cardboard sheets can be purchased at any art store). tape (I used masking tape) double-sided tape spray glue or large glue stick pencil utility knife MAKING THE BOX TEMPLATE 1. Print the [4] four template pieces. 2. Cut along the inner edges of the template

How to Raise Your Cutting Table to Reduce Back Strain

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When I worked as a graphic designer, I sat for long hours at the computer. It was easy to get lost in my work and not pay attention to my body. I paid the price, however, because this caused me to suffer from back pain for years. So, when I started quilting more, it became clear that I needed an ergonomically friendly cutting table. There were several options available to me, but I opted to buy the Linnmon/Finvard table from Ikea. This Ikea table height can be adjusted to several heights with a "peg-in-the-hole system." This table was a great buy, but there are other ways to get a raised table without putting out a lot of cash.   Linnmon/Finvard adjustable worktable from Ikea. HOW TO RAISE YOUR CUTTING TABLE TO REDUCE BACK STRAIN (Updated July 5, 2018) FIRST FIND THE CORRECT TABLE HEIGHT FOR YOU Measure from the floor to about 6 inches below your elbow. This will give you the proper table height for your height. 1.  FOLD-AWAY TABLE AND PVC PIPE You can make most a

Three DIY Pin Cushion Ideas with Tutorials and Free pattern

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1. How to Make a Vintage Planter Pin Cushion Pin cushions are an absolute necessity in any sewing studio. You usually don't realize this until you don't have one around when you need it. If you go online or on Pinterest, you'll see hundreds of different variations of a pin cushion. There was, however, one pin cushion I fell in love with. It's the vintage planter pin cushion. I came across these little cuties at Lovely Little Handmaids  and knew I had to make one. I picked up a vintage planter at the flower shop and, in no time, I made this adorable little pin cushion. See the instructions below to make your own. I think they would make great gifts for your sewing friends. INSTRUCTIONS You can probably find one of these little planters at a thrift shop or rummage sale for a few cents. You may also want to check out your local florist shop to see if they have any kicking around from days gone by. That's where I found mine. Step One To give the pin cushion extra