Posts

How to make bag straps with quilt batting

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Apple Cider Market Tote aka Winslow Market Tote I first saw this tote pattern in the 2018 issue of Make It! Patchwork.  It was designed by Kathy Mack and was showcased on the Quilting Arts TV Episode #601 . It was originally featured as the  Winslow Market Tote and has since been renamed the  Apple Cider Market Tote .  I haven't made many bags, but I fell in love with this one as soon as I saw it. I wasn't sure, however, what fat quarters to use for it. When I finally dug through my stash, I found the perfect fabric for this tote ─  Into the Garden by Amanda Herring for Riley Blake. I bought this fat quarter bundle several years ago and loved it so much I didn't want to cut it! I also wanted to make pretty matching straps for this bag, but I wasn't sure how to make bag straps. I heard you could use quilt batting for straps and thought that this would be a great way to use up my batting scraps. After a YouTube search, I found a great tutorial for making bag straps wi

Round Table Placemat

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If you have a round table for your home, why not make a few of these elegant-looking "round" placemats. They fit beautifully on a 42 inch and up dining table. I think they look much nicer on a round table than the traditional rectangle placemats.  Makes a wonderful Christmas Setting The placemat patterns come in three styles that are very easy to make: a reversible, seven-wedge, and nine-wedge placemat. All the templates are full page printable. BUY NOW

How to Make French Fold Binding

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French Fold binding is one of the most popular quilt bindings and for good reason. Because the fabric is doubled, French Fold binding creates a durable edge for your quilt. It's particularly good for quilts and quilted items that are going to get a lot of laundering. It's a very simple binding to make. I use it on all my quilt projects. If you want to add a little flair to your French Fold binding, see my tutorial on French Fold with Flange binding. HOW TO MAKE FRENCH FOLD BINDING 1) DETERMINE THE BINDING LENGTH YOU NEED   EXAMPLE : Finished quilt size = 54" × 60" (54" × 2) + (60" × 2) + 10" = 238" (10" extra is added for finishing the binding). (238" ÷ 36") = 6.6 yards You will need 6.6 ≈ 7 yards of binding for a 54" × 60" finished quilt. If making bias binding, cut your fabric strips on the diagonal before making your binding. 2) DETERMINE THE BINDING WIDTH YOU NEED Decide on the binding width you need, then refer t

How to Make Flange Quilt Binding

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I love flange quilt binding. It gives quilts an elegant and finished look. I don't use it on all my projects, but sometimes a quilt needs that extra pop. Flange binding takes a little extra work, but it's well worth the effort when you see the finished result. I made the following tutorial as comprehensive as possible and hope it will help you give flange binding a try. INSTRUCTIONS 1) CALCULATE THE LENGTH OF BINDING YOU WILL NEED FOR YOUR QUILT EXAMPLE: Finished quilt size = 54" × 60" (54" × 2) + (60" × 2) + 10" = 238" (10" extra is added for finishing the binding).  (238" ÷ 36") = 6.6 yards You will need 6.6 ≈ 7 yards of binding for a 54" × 60" finished quilt.  2) WIDTHS TO CUT FOR FLANGE AND MAIN COLOUR STRIPS Decide on a binding width and refer to the chart below to get the correct overall strip width for that binding. Important Note: When choosing a binding width, keep in mind your batting loft thickness. Using

Garden Breeze Table Runner

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Here is my newest table runner pattern, Garden Breeze , just in time for summer. I designed this project using the half-hexagon whirligig block in floral prints. The whirligig block is a traditional favourite and so simple to foundation piece. Anyone new to foundation piecing will love making this table runner. BUY NOW My hubby loves to garden. We don't have a big yard, but he turned it into a little piece of heaven. This is the pond that we put in a few years ago. Photo by Monica Curry Here is Teddy taking a dip in the pond to cool off. This little guy is a real character! Photo by Monica Curry

Easter Blessings Banner

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Easter is coming up quick and I was so glad to get this beautiful pattern Easter Blessings launched before the celebrations. This is a very simple project if you have basic skills in foundation paper piecing. The optional tabs are a nice touch to create a banner for your home or church. BUY NOW

TOP 10 favourite things in my studio . . .

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Like most of you, my studio had humble beginnings but over time evolved into a creative sanctuary. As in any good studio, there are special items that keep me inspired, grounded, and working efficiently. In no special order, these are the Top 10 things in my studio I would never part with. 1.  MY ART QUILT ON THE QUILTING ARTS MAGAZINE COVER This framed Quilting Arts magazine cover featuring one of my art quilts helps to remind me that hard work and perseverance can pay off and that even though I've created some epic fails, I've also created some beautiful work that others can appreciate. In 2012 my art quilt Mother Ship was selected to be published for the Quilting Arts magazine Readers Challenge. I was even more excited when I was told my art was going to be on the front cover of the magazine. The Readers Challenge was to create an art quilt interpreting the phrase "What If." Being a UFO/alien buff, I wondered "What if I saw a UFO over my house?" an

How to sort and cut scraps for nine-patch blocks

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SORTING & CUTTING YOUR SCRAPS FOR 9-PATCH BLOCKS A year ago, I posted a tutorial for sorting fabric scraps. I decided to supplement that post with a quick tutorial for cutting fabric scrap squares for 9-patch blocks. Because of their versatility, 9-patch blocks are great for making scrap quilts. Below are only a few 9-patch blocks you can make with scraps. YOU WILL NEED A good assortment of quilt cotton fabric scraps Iron and ironing board Rotary cutter (have fresh blades available) 6" x 12" and/or 8" x 8" quilt ruler 4. Before cutting squares, stack several pieces and line up the top right corner.  INSTRUCTIONS 1. Separate your scraps into individual colours: yellow, orange, purple, red, etc. This is a very important step. You don't want to have to sort little 2-inch squares by colour, trust me! 2. Sort scraps by size. 3. Press all the scraps before cutting. A quick way to do this is to layer about 4 to 6 pieces and steam press. 4. Before cutting squares,